Friday, October 12, 2012

"Baltimore Rhapsody" Block #8 - the trombone


In continuation of my original "Baltimore Rhapsody" quilt (read back story here), here is the third brass block, the trombone, which is Italian for "big trumpet."  The brand of this one is "Conn," I embroidered it on the medallion on the lower parallel arm...


The old English name, "sackbut," comes from two French words meaning "pull-push, which describes how the instrument is played (pulling and pushing the slide to change pitches...).  Most 5th grade boys (and me!) think this is hilarious ("You play a sackbut, you play a sackbut!").


The trombone was actually the first brass instrument to be perfected in the early 1400's and was a favorite instrument in early church service music.  This was because early valveless trumpets and horns could not play the hymn melodies to lead the congregation in the singing of hymns. 


Four trombone sizes were used to match the voices, soprano, alto, tenor and bass, although the soprano and alto trombone versions were eventually discarded.


The tubing of the tenor version, when unwound, measures about nine feet long.  Trombones are very popular in jazz, concert and marching bands.  Most people recognize it's signature "slide" sound.  Symphonic masters such as Brahms utilized trombones in beautiful brass choir sections along with trumpets, French horns and tubas.





I decided to reverse applique the posie centers so they would look "deeper" than the petals.  This requires cutting a center hole in each posie petal section and turning the edges under (instead of turning the edges under on the center and simply stitching it to the top of the petal piece.

Here I am snipping tiny slices (to "ease" the edge) with my little scissors before applying the gluestick and turning the inner edge segments to the back.


After applying the Elmer's Disappearing Purple Gluestick to the center edge, I fold/prod the edge segments down, using the paper pattern (ironed to the front side) edge as my guide.




Now I audition posie centers, choosing possibilities from my tiny saved scraps.


(my clumsy fingers really like using these long tweezers to pick up and manipulate all the fussy little pieces...)


Here are the backsides, with centers glue-basted into place, ready to do the hand applique (off block).


Ta-da!  I was playful with my centers, using a big polka dot and a fussy-cut swirl on two of them.


Tracing the freezer paper leaves...


Thank you to everyone who either left comments or emailed me about remedies for my thumb!  After a couple of days away from stitching, I have healed, and now I have"Liquid skin," masking tape, clear finger nail polish, band-aids, a small homemade leather patch, etc. in my sewing kit to try as I continue stitching this weekend!

Now that I have disallowed "Anonymous" comments, I have had no more spam blogger emails in my in box!  Yippee!  If you would like to be able to leave comments (and participate in give-aways!) on peoples' blogs, it is very easy to get a free Google account. 

All you need is an email address and a password.  You can do this without exposing personal info in your profile.  It just makes it possible for us to respond to your comments and questions (and pick you as winners!).

I will be posting a long overdue give-away on Monday to celebrate going over 500 followers (thank you to everyone who follows my blog - I appreciate each and every one of you so much!).

In stitches,
Teresa  :o)

p.s.  The patterns of "Baltimore Rhapsody" are original copywritten designs that will be available soon!

15 comments:

  1. Oohh
    , I think this is my favorite so far. Love the vase and flowers. My middle son played trombone in middle and high school so this block brings back lots of memories!

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  2. Teresa, What a lovely vase and pedestal to complement your trombone!! Also the step by step turning process is beautifully documented in your photos! Thanks - it is VERY impressive!

    P.S. Since my last sassy comments about your thumb pricks, I have suffered several of the same injury and they really sting! I guess that is what I get! I hope your wounds are healing nicely :)

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  3. I love love love this block...so happy and uplifting...makes me smile!
    Hope your injury heals fast. I have a similar issue from hand quilting.
    I'm taking a break from hand work today too :)

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  4. dear teresa,your instruments are all very beautiful,i am exited to see more of them,happy stitching,susi

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  5. I just love all your stories that you share with the blocks. :)

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  6. These musical Baltimore blocks are amazing! Glad your hand is healing...

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  7. Your blocks are so cleverly done. This one is terrific.

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  8. I am loving watching these blocks grow.

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  9. "Baltimore Rhapsody" is a very special pattern..... each block makes it better and better!

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  10. How very interesting to read all you are posting about the history of these instruments! Imagine soprano, alto, tenor and bass trombones playing together in church - wow!! And of course reverse applique for the flower centers :0) You wouldn't want to make the applique too easy - lol! Love these blocks!!

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  11. I can leave comments today...who knows. My suggestion for your last post was to use embellishment glue on your injury. I know that sounnds bizarre, but once I was bleeding on a quilt and grabbed the nearest glue and just glued the injury shut. It works as well as the liquid skin and is a lot cheaper. And it lasts through handwashing.

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  12. gorgeous block. I love the pedestal - wonderful!
    Are you going to sell these patterns? or do a block of the month, just curious.

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  13. love that block and I learned a lot about the trombone. thanks for sharing that fun info.

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  14. What a beautiful block Teresa, and I adore that blue and white vase. Love the info about the trombone too, very interesting. xo

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  15. Your Baltimore Rapsody trombone block is awesome.

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